Pobody’s Nerfect in Marketing

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Perfectionism – it’s a waist waste of time

 

Churchill said perfectionism is the enemy of progress. And in many respects, he is right. In a field where creative endeavours are part and parcel of everyday life and by the very nature of presenting your work you open yourself up to criticism from the client and the subjective masses which makes perfection a lofty goal but can also be debilitating.

We discussed this very topic recently on our podcast – listen to the Perfection ep here)

I’ll be honest, we often struggle with getting things absolutely perfect for a job. Not for lack of want or skill mind you but because it’s the nature of the beast… and perhaps it is unattainable in the first place but more on that later.

We aim to achieve best results for the job at hand, be it a:

  • higher ROI on the next advertising campaign;
  • more brand awareness than a competitor from a social campaign;
  • Or more signups from a membership drive.

By setting your sights on a high but attainable goal you can save a lot of hassle and heartache.

TIME AND MONEY IN MARKETING

Time is a factor on two fronts

  • The client has paid a certain amount for a result and we have estimated how much time we will spend on delivering the outcome. So when we are in the studio we will design until it’s of a quality that will achieve said result.
  • Of course, time is money in any business but it’s not the only reason time is a factor because time is also time. It’s fleeting and unfortunately, we don’t have a secret pause button – if you have one though DM me – I’m willing to pay, I’m not picky even a slo-mo feature I’ll take.

 

We have deadlines so we can’t spend endless hours on anything although we may want to for the simple fact that we don’t have all the time in the world. The deadlines can be client driven ie we need this product launch to happen by this date and also society driven in our social media driven world we have a very short news cycle and attention span – so we have to be agile and reactive when it comes to creating strong, shareable content. You may want to jump on the latest news item that is brand adjacent and have a view point and you have to write, design, edit, approve all before it’s forgotten about and more importantly before your competitor has beaten you to the punch.

FALLACY?

Perhaps that’s why being a perfectionist is flawed because there is no such thing as perfect.

We often look for perfection in all elements of our lives and it can lead to a waste of time. Interestingly, there is a subbranch of mathematics called “optimal stopping” and having its roots in theories of the sunk cost fallacy

A little explanation of optimal stopping you aim to stop what you are doing at the right time. And that time is 37%… 37% of what you were planning on spending to establish a basis of your decision and then the next one that exceeds that is the winner – and you have to commit for it to work consistently.

This can be great for design but even more perfect for something like image search, where the list of options could be endless.

THE KEY TO THRIVING

Process is the key to circumventing perfection and lead to the desired end goal. In fact, process creates a perfection that is often overlooked. Part of the process is what I have already alluded to setting your KPIs and defining your time allowed. Having a strategy and dedicated phase of work will allow the idea to evolve. And having the process can actually prevent procrastination which can be a real enemy of quality work.

So accept that there is no such thing as perfect – stop critiquing every little thing, stop waiting for Mr/Mrs Right, stop expecting everything to go 100% according to plan and you will not only be happier but get a lot more done.

And now that’s all said, here’s something that is very nearly perfect:

THE CREATIVE MOMENT

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Earned Media from calendar events

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Earned media from calendar events
Is it too late for an April Fools Day Joke?

We often look to the calendar when brainstorming – after all it’s kind of a no-brainer you want to be part of the zeitgeist and what better way than focussing on pre-scheduled events that everyone is aware of.

It’s all well and good to design a social post with a bunny and a Happy Easter plastered on top OR create an advertising campaign around Christmas. It doesn’t have to be a well established holiday if you noticed last month was Pride Month in the US and brands were all quick to jump on the bandwagon.

But to really set yourself apart from the crowd you may want to focus your brain power on creating something a little out of the ordinary to get you noticed.

This classic (which had mixed reactions) is from a few of years ago

We are often inundated with tongue in cheek campaigns on April Fools or Halloween but the truly inventive ones get themselves shared and mentioned around the water coolers and on numerous media types.


Earned media: Any positive mention of my brand, created by someone other than me, published somewhere other than my site.

One of my favourite pranks (intentional or not) is the War of the Worlds (WotW) radio play by Orson Welles. As far as pranks go – it’s a doozy. Now, it wasn’t thought up by the marketing department nor was it intended to create the uproar that it did… But it did just that… and the earned media was amazing:

 

 

Imagine all that coverage – One might argue… what a waste – there was really no strategy as to how to best take advantage of the prank. But in all reality, we are still talking about it today and perhaps we don’t know that it was the Mercury Theatre but indeed we remember Orson Welles (Citizen Kane not withstanding) is so synonymous with WotW that one has to ask whether we you are talking about HG or Orson when talking Welles/Wells in relation to WotW. The full and rather interesting story on WotW can be found here.

Another great way to inspire people is to let them in on the joke NPR for their April Fool’s joke was:

Source: NPR

 

It inspired over 2000k comments and lots of goodwill to NPR for those in on the joke.

 

 

And of course, Google always does a great effort here is a list, but this is pretty cool

It’s not all April Fools obviously; Easter and Anzac Day have just passed by with their share of earned media attempts from (not always successfully)

Our series on Super Bowl advertising here and here whilst paid for, often turns into earned media that keeps on giving.

Other sporting events are a great for earned media not least of which the world cup.

Focussing on the calendar doesn’t have to mean yearly events you can also glom on to major events in general like the upcoming election or sticking with the political theme the same sex marriage vote caused a lot of companies to take sides leading up to the event and even after.

You might be thinking is this a task for PR or for your marketing team to be honest it’s both I think Alex Honeysett hit the nail on the head over at The Muse


 

“The truth is, you can’t market without doing a little PR, and you can’t do PR without a little marketing. The end goals—selling products and making people love a company—are too intertwined: If your products are terrible, your company probably won’t be viewed favourably by the public, and if people aren’t connecting with your overall brand, they’re probably not going to buy your products.”


So the key really is to have fun with it, it helps keep your brand front and centre in your audience’s mind – it doesn’t have to be big budget just a cool little nugget of an idea can grow and catch on. If you need help with the nuggets give us a bell.

 

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Are your Marketing plans stalled?

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Why haven’t you started your marketing plans yet?
Or kept it going?

It’s a common occurrence that around new year’s or the end of financial year you start thinking about your business and marketing plans for the coming period. But you also know that it is quite a daunting prospect trying to get things in order. We discussed this very topic recently on our podcast – listen to the Procrastination ep here)

The fact that things aren’t in order right now makes the problem seem bigger than it actually is and can cause undue worry and anxiety.

Not having your marketing plans in place means you are losing opportunities and ground on your competitors. I know, I know I just started talking about worry and anxiety and then I follow up with even more doom and gloom – sorry.

And I will grant that you that anxiety about a task can lead to procrastination – in which case you need to take a holistic view and create a strategy that will give lead to success but also breaks your tasks down into manageable portions.

Don’t leave your marketing till it’s too late

A previous client had 6 months to prepare for one of the biggest annual events for their industry and whilst the physical attributes of their production were being seen too they continually pushed back the efforts on the digital front thinking that it is the easiest.

We ended up having to do a rush job for them and they still got a result but not the result they would have gotten if the thought and approvals had been there in a timely manner.

If it’s not the daunting nature of starting that has got you dragging your heels then there are usually three main reasons why you haven’t started:

No money

No time

No belief that it will work

To which I say:

Marketing Budgets

Having an appropriate marketing budget is key and by that, I mean a considered look at the finances but also how much X leads or Y conversions would mean to your business’s bottom line.

When you see a political party taking money from education to put somewhere else – you think to yourself “no, we need that shit” – well, marketing is the same you need that shit.

If you don’t have the budget for marketing or not factoring it in to your sale price then your business won’t last long. If it’s not – don’t buy that new car or other luxury item until it is – because getting your messaging out to your potential clients is more important.

No time to run marketing campaigns

Practice what you preach – when we were just starting out we actually had very little time on our hands – so much so, we would be making recommendations to clients that we hadn’t taken on board ourselves. For example, there was a good year or so where we were practically insisting that clients needed to update to a responsive website (one that scales for different size screens – PC, tablet or mobile). But we sucked it up and made the adjustment as soon as we could.

Marketing is a waste of money and resources

It’s not a waste of money – when done correctly marketing will make more sales if that’s the goal. Marketing, even carried out with a modicum of effort and strategy, is still not a waste. You will get knowledge and insight into the market place, your customers, what worked what didn’t; you will raise awareness, gain trust/credibility and build your brand;

Perhaps you have had a bad experience marketing previously, well if you have a bad meal at a restaurant then don’t go back to that restaurant as opposed to never eating again. Sticking with the same analogy of food as marketing – you might be a good cook yourself and by all means keep cooking but if you run out of time to cook and need a restaurant or if you don’t have time to shop or not sure what to cook speak to one of our expert team.

The proof is in the pudding – Marketing may be hard but It’s worth it – It is like Henry Ward Beacher said:

“It’s easier to go down a hill than up it but the view is much better at the top.”

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D-Day Marketing – Time to make a stand?

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D-Day Marketing – Time to make a stand?

So why is it that small business really struggles to market themselves?
And what can you do about it?

I deal with small businesses on a daily basis, and one of the things that I can tell you is that almost 90% of them have grown organically. They’ve done so via word of mouth, or with very little marketing foundation, in order to promote their product.

This leads to a significant challenge, when the time comes to try and grow beyond where they are – beyond word of mouth. It happens across two key levels of the business.

The first level is that any growth is going to require, in most cases, an investment in resources: personnel, equipment, product or whatever it might be and that is going to cost the business money. The second attribute is an area that most businesses have never accounted for, of course I speak of, marketing. And the margins in small business are often very compromised especially when they’re being eaten away by a new influence, such as an investment in marketing.

For businesses that have no platform, and have never marketed before, one of the key challenges that they face is the idea that they need to build momentum. And let’s face it, whether it’s running up the hill, or losing weight or achieving any goal the most difficult part is often just getting started. Once you have momentum, it is far easier to maintain it. Much like a cold room takes a lot longer to heat up than it is to maintain once the fire is roaring.

So the investment to make that momentum is often upfront. And that can be a scary proposition for business who don’t know whether the marketing that they are about to undertake will work.

And there is always some risk that your marketing approach might fail, however there is likely greater risk by not marketing at all. I think it was Stuart H Britt that said something along the lines of Doing business without advertising is like smiling at that girl you like in the dark. You know you smiled but nobody else does. So we have to get the message about your business out there and having dealt with so many businesses over a really long time, we can use the experience and insights we have learned to help design a plan that should make that smile shine.

And like most things, be it exercise or a diet the hardest part is often just starting. People procrastinate endlessly waiting for the perfect moment but you just have to get in there and have a go. Now, if you’re a large business with a large budget, it is often easier to forecast what the genuine return on investment will be because you are able to generate momentum immediately through volume of communication all of which builds a certain gravity around the investment that you make, but for small to medium businesses who haven’t got, the platform in place, or the momentum, often we need to pick a Normandy.

For those that aren’t familiar with this concept, Normandy was where the Allied troops struck the German army at the end of World War Two, the idea was that the allies would concentrate as much of their resources into a targeted attack in order to break through what was a significantly robust German defense.

Planning the assault – Marketing Strategy to make noise

And in marketing terms, we must identify a similar scenario seeking out a way to, despite the noise of the “market”, find cut through.

Our approach is to build an integrated strategy that identifies some core channels and some key messaging that we amplify to deliver a sales result. One of these core channels is
social media.

Social media has created a genuine opportunity to cost effectively reach an audience, and more importantly, to build a fan base or tribe. When you think about traditional marketing options, that really wasn’t the case. In fact, even large businesses that had built a fan base found they were often disparate and with no considered centralised connection. Social has changed that, which is why it has been a revolution for small to medium businesses.

Moreover, the digital environment has for the first time allowed us to accurately track and report on the engagement of “fans” and link that to sales and performance data.

This is an enormously powerful situation. But there are some rules to make this happen:

You need a plan
You need great content, written and visual
You need to be dynamic and respond to the audience to fully exploit “Your Normandy”
And, you need a proper budget that is aligned to your desired outcome.

And so one of our greatest challenges is actually educating SME’s in particular on making an appropriate investment in their marketing, because we often find people’s budget simply does not match their ambition. And they need to make a two to three year plan that allows us to build momentum, build the audience, and then mine that audience for sales.

And it is important to recognize that when I am talking about budget I am not just talking MONEY to deliver great marketing outcomes your commitment includes time to help bring this to life and one of the major flaws that we see, and this is not scale dependent, is that your agency is not someone that you just tell what you want to do. It is a partnership, it is a marriage, and you both need to be going in the same direction for a smooth and effective outcome. So what we would recommend is having some clear goals and objectives have a realistic view in terms of both what your team can invest in actively delivering the initiatives as well as having a proper and considered financial budget to match. If $5,000 could turn into $1 million on 3 months then everybody in the world would be doing it.

You would be shocked by the amount of times that I hear businesses say we’d like to make a million dollar sales. And we are we thinking $5 to $10K investment that is simply absurd.

But a 100K to 200K investment over 12 to 18 months might just deliver you results like this.

At the end of the day marketing is a gamble, but for the most part when you partner with an agency like us we have seen what works for many businesses, across many industries. You pay for that knowledge and experience and in the end it will SAVE you both TIME and MONEY.

So, the real question – is are you ready to grow your business???

If so please get in touch and speak to one of our expert team.

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LISTEN: Social Media – What is it good for?

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Welcome to the Remember Podcast

Social Media | What is it good for?

Today, we get down to basics and discuss social media – the good, the bad and the ugly of it. How it can be a tough sell but also something that can be quite transformative for a brand.

Put your ear phones in – sit back, relax and hit play…

 

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Is Social right for your business? It wasn’t right for Lush

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Is Social right for your business? It wasn’t right for Lush

Lush wiping the slate clean with Social Media

So, the big news recently was that Lush, the cosmetics company, have departed the social media space.

As a digital agency, you may be surprised to hear that I think that Lush may be just one of many brands that may seek to do this over time. I also believe, though, that Lush’s timing was about getting PR around that concept, as much as it was a genuine thought of we’re going to leave social.

They have probably generated more PR around the fact that they’re leaving the social space than they would have in terms of engagement in the social space itself of late.

Why did Lush leave?

Let’s look at why they might have gone –

Lush is quite a significant business with a global footprint. Hence, they probably do have both the resources financially and internally to manage a proper social engagement. But when you look at where social is going. The genuine reality is, it is no longer the cheap, free and easy platform that it once was.

To peddle your product going forward will become a challenge for big business and small businesses alike (Not that it is a challenge you can’t overcome but a challenge nonetheless).

But what a brand name like Lush does have is amazing owned-platforms in their database and website. It’s one thing that social media companies don’t want the average punter to know and that is that they own the real estate that you are conducting business on and you must pay rent to sit at the table.

So, Lush has done the numbers looked over their engagement rates and ROIs on email and website based campaigns and realised that it’s something that they can exploit to connect with their million or more customers.

Let’s look at social and what value it may provide to Lush versus the value of leaving.

I think the first thing is that, for Lush to compete at a high level as a brand would mean a huge investment in beautiful, well executed content. Now the question for a brand like that is does the brand awareness that they build in the social space have enough gravitas to pull customers into the stores, where they’re probably being led primarily by price, versus the value of their existing customer database, which is now quite extensive, in the ease of potentially converting existing customers to ongoing loyalty.

And I think when you look at it, they’ve made a decision that the cost of acquisition, and brand awareness is probably higher than their cost of maintaining or retaining clients through their loyalty scheme.

I think the second attribute, and this is one that many businesses really do need to consider is, websites have become the forgotten member of the family.

Think back 10 years ago or more when Facebook was, I guess in its earliest days, it wasn’t the tool for marketing that it is today. And most businesses invested heavily in having a really, really fantastic website, where they have a great deal of content for their audience.

Now, we do know that a huge proportion of the world’s population is hanging out daily on Facebook, Instagram, or even LinkedIn at a professional level.

Drawing that audience to your website, generically from a pure acquisition point of view, is not going to be simple for Lush but with the size and scale of their database… I think what they’re betting on is that they can engage people in their own environment, and have a free platform, in essence, to deliver whatever content they want.

And they don’t have to be concerned about trying to outsmart the Facebook or the Instagram algorithms to deliver that content to an ever increasingly noisy social environment.

So what’s the advice for your business?

The truth is that you have to look at it on an individual basis. So, if you have very, very limited opportunity to resell your product to a customer, or you have a very, very long repeat business cycle, then the database strategy, whilst valuable is probably too long term and not going to deliver you the results, you need to be a brand awareness and acquisition focused.

 

However, if you, like Lush, have a solid set of clients that are heavily engaged with your business, the reality is that you’re 60% more likely to resell a product to that customer, then you are to try and sell that product to a new customer .

The upshot is, if you are going to make an investment, once you have a word that I like to use gravity or momentum, then it can be really, really valuable to become more brand centric.

 

It’s important to note that Lush’s US wing definitely did not close their accounts

So what’s the future for lush? And is that strategy long term?

I think the answer is probably it’s a medium term strategy. In other words, and what they’re doing is, they’re moving away from social so that they can really spend the limited budget that they might have remembering their repeat business, but everyone has budget limitations.

They’re using that limited budget to hone in on what they probably have seen in the data as one of the most profitable aspects of their sales funnel.

In time, that funnel will deplete naturally, because all businesses face the reality that their customers drop away. And at that time, this strategy will need to change. But for the Intermediate Period, it is a very, very valuable concept for that business.

So what do you do?

Well, like I said above, I think you need to focus in on a couple of key things.

How big is your database?

how active is your database?

Do you have any data around the value of returning business?

If you do, and it is all very, very positive then your business may just want to follow in the footprints of Lush.

If you don’t, it’s not going to work. But even if you aren’t going to go down a database approach, I would still be hesitant to suggest that you withdraw from social altogether in the way that Lush has.

And the reason is because it will be much harder to switch it back on again, I refer to this idea of momentum, if you’ve really given up on the audience that was loyal to you in that space.

And another aspect that can’t be counted out is that we often don’t know what might turn the tide on our business, changes in your industry, changes in the market landscape could really, really impact very quickly on how loyal your loyal customers are to you. And so maintaining an audience on a brand awareness level is important.

So that’s our take on what Lush has done, on why they’ve done it, and a little insight into how you might be able to use that tactic or not use that tactic for your business. If you’d like to know any more information about how we could potentially build a strategy for your business based around these concepts.

Please feel free to get in touch with me or contact any of my team we’d be more than happy to help.

 

 

hero image by tony webster

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LISTEN: Perfectionism | The fly in the ointment

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Welcome to the Remember Podcast

Perfectionism | a blemish on your record

In this episode, we discuss perfectionism and how it’s not a positive attribute but can cause negative outcomes.

Hit play and enjoy…

 

 

And speaking of perfectionism, what magic made this:

 

via Gfycat

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LISTEN: Procrastination

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Welcome to the Remember Podcast

Why haven’t you started your marketing yet?

In this episode, we discuss not having enough time on your hands and why it is actually hard for some of us to start marketing and stick to the plan.

Hit play and enjoy…

 

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What businesses often fail to understand about social

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What businesses often fail to understand about social

Finding the true worth of social

 

Have you ever sat back and said “I don’t get how social works for my business” or are you doing social and thinking “This is pointless” only to read every second day how people are building empires from social media exposure for their business?

Meeting as many business people as I do, especially men and women in their late 40s through to their mid 60s I often see and hear how they just don’t think social is doing anything for their business.

Sometimes, we will be engaged by a client for social whom we know will leave us after 6 months and question our role and the role of social at all in their business.

We have a wide array of processes in place to try and educate customers on the role of social, the realities of undertaking it, the commitment required to do it well and the potential outcomes for their businesses over time, but often despite all this our customers (a certain, small percentage, mind you) will leave and feel they got nothing out of their investment.

You may be thinking it is unusual for one to be so honest about a failed business relationship, but it is this approach that typifies how social works: being genuine and informative and I think there are lessons to be shared and learned by showcasing failure not merely success.

And as Henry Ford says failure is simply the opportunity to begin again, this time more intelligently. Which is why each time we have a disappointing or failed experience with a client we further refine our offering to offer and even better service to our current an future customers.

So our success on any project often comes down to a combination of factors, some as an agency we can influence, others we can’t. But here are some are three key factors to consider when looking to find success sin social:

  1. Content
  2. Time
  3. Tracking

 

Content – MAKE IT GREAT – CREATE MOMENTS

One of the greatest mistakes brands/businesses make with social is they merely take their approach to promoting their products/services and plonk them on a social platform.

Social media is NOT an advertising medium in the traditional sense. Yes, people advertise there, but what really gets followers engaged is thoughtful and interesting content.

People in the social environment want to be entertained, intrigued and delighted but above all followers want genuineness… and it is that aspect of social, businesses fail to understand.

Successful brands in the social space don’t just “Brand” content, their content exemplifies their brand, its values, its approach and therefore it speaks clearly not merely about the products or services they sell, but why the brand exists and whom they exist for.

If you take a look at Red Bull for instance their content richly reflects their brand and appeals to those who identify with the more extreme… and if not those who necessarily live that life, at least those who aspire to add a little more excitement to their day. It isn’t about the product itself but the “lifestyle” the drink fits into.

A brand I have worked on – Maccona also has a hugely successful social following, and their content is all driven around the core idea that Maccona (the product) provides its drinkers with a moment of escape, through the taste, through the ritual of having a coffee. So, their content is formulated to provide a similar and simple moment of escape online.

Now these are both beverage brands and when I showcase these examples to customers (not in the Fast-Moving Consumer Good Space – FMCG) they often refute their ability to achieve this when their product or service is so much more utilitarian or generic.

And my argument is simple That is Bullshit.

Sure, your business won’t produce content that emulates Red Bull or Moccona, but there is no good reason why your brand/business can’t make content in the social space that is authentic to your brand and provides genuine engagement for your customers.

So, what is an example. Well if you haven’t followed the NSW police – check it out. Now I reckon the cops have a pretty tough sell on their hand with enforcing the law…. And let’s face it the “constabulary” don’t always have the easiest brand position either. But some of their stuff is pure gold.

Or what about mailchimp. Let’s face it mailchimp sells the ability to send emails to customers and its one of hundreds of similar products. It’s far from sexy, and as a facilitator who exists in a highly price sensitive environment – what could this brand really do to be “social”.

Mailchimp have done three things that I think are very clever for such a pragmatic product.

  1. In the social space they have taken a very pragmatic approach, their content is typically designed to give real working examples of how to maximise the effectiveness of your communications and in turn they seek to showcase the ease of use, not to mention how to maximise the outcomes using their platform.
  2. They have been consistent in their approach with regular posts across platforms both in terms of frequency and content.
  3. They have spent time and continue to invest in a brand identity (visual style) that goes beyond their logo and underpins the way they present their social communications.

 

This visual style is clever and recognisable and something that not many brands bother investing in. This isn’t just content it is content that is branded both in terms of the strategic approach as well as the ongoing content presentation.

There’s a lot we can learn from these brands, these are not funky products, not emotive brands and yet they have found a way to show their personality despite having boring businesses. They’ve produced genuine content that reflect their brand on social media which keep users alert to their future posts but also keeps their brand front of mind which will allow you to get more followers, build engagement, and grow your business, but let’s be honest to make all of this happen and build a solid following will take…..

 

TIME – ROME AND A SOCIAL FOLLOWING – BOTH WEREN’T BUILT IN A DAY

Building a social following for a retail fashion brand like Boohoo or The Iconic can be rapid and the numbers of followers, sharers and buyers – massive. Again, not every business will have this same ability. So, understanding your business and your customer is vital in determining how many followers you want and having a plan for how long it might take to reach them is just as important.

What is also important in determining the time investment required for your social presence is the latency of your sales funnel/process. For example, if you sell cheap holidays the time between posting via your social channels and seeing a sales response may be a mere matter of days, but if you are selling large mining equipment it may take an extended and ongoing effort to see conversions from social.

In some respects, however your regular sales process should give you some indication around this, so if you do sell heavy machinery don’t expect to put up a post on Linked In once and sell a 1000. Expect it to take some time to build, we suggest that to properly target and build an engaged social following will take a minimum of nine months and up to 18 months before certain business types will see results begin to flow.

But how do you know?

 

TRACKING – SOCIAL SHOULD BE TRACKED – IT’S NOT JUST FOR FUN

This is a big one – And socially savvy businesses consider this often long before they even make a post. How you track success and how you track sales through your social media initiatives are vital to the process and how you seek to measure this will vary business to business and product to product.

Ultimately, investing in systems that track sales and the channel from which they were derived is one thing, but if your business doesn’t have robust digital systems in place, then try simple things like unique URLs, pricing or promotional codes that can help your sales teams track sales coming from your social channels specifically.

This really is very important because, as an example, we worked with a client once who saw a 15% uptick in sales in six months after investing in social with us. We asked them if they could see the correlation between our social campaign and their sales increase. And their response was “no one has specifically said they found us through social, so we are no sure this is working”.

As an agency, there was only so much we could track the performance (within the scope of the brief), so whilst we could see and share from the analytic data showing the increased traffic to the website, see the increase in online enquiries and they reported the subsequent increase in sales Without the client actually finding out where customers found them, we couldn’t close the loop in regard to the effectiveness of the work.

Which brings me back to the crux of this article. Why do some of our clients fail to see value in social?

I think it is often a lack of understanding of one or each the above key factors and the effort that each takes in tandem to find success. Whether you are executing your social in-house, by yourself or with an agency partner you really do have to be invested; invested in the idea of creating meaningful content, invested in the idea of being patient and giving your social initiatives time to work and invested in the systems and processes to track its performance.

As an agency who helps business with social, what I can tell you is whilst our talent at producing great content and managing the complex nuances of each platform is what we pride ourselves in, what makes a truly great relationship and delivers the best outcomes in social is when the client is truly invested in the outcome and knows why social is important for their business.

Give us your feedback – Why is social important or not important to your business?

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Written By: Michael Menzies

The Anatomy of the Perfect Instagram Post

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The Anatomy of the Perfect Instagram Post

  1. Make sure your image is visually appealing. Bright, colourful and in theme with the rest of your Instagram feed!
  2. Use a high quality photo. Blurry and pixelated photos can make you look unprofessional and your account uncurated and unplanned.
  3. Use your caption to grab attention. Words like “You”, “Free” and “New” are always good, and using questions to engage your audience is usually very effective also, such as “Do you like this quote?” or “Would you choose the red or the white dress?”.
  4. Have a call to action. For example: “Link to read the rest of the blog post is in our bio!” or “Head to the link in our bio to shop now!”.
  5. Use relevant hashtags, but no more than 8! Any more and you will see a drop in engagement. It is a very fine line. Try not to put them in the caption, but rather as a comment on the post.
  6. And finally, respond to comments and answer questions! People will buy from you once they trust you!

Happy posting!​

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Written By: Claudia